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60-minute Presentation [clear filter]
Wednesday, March 20
 

10:30am

Analyzing Virtual Reference Transcripts with Machine Learning
Using open-source machine learning packages, it is possible for librarians to process, analyze, and leverage increasingly large sets of unstructured data. When the appropriate tools and techniques are applied, virtual reference transcripts represent a treasure trove of unstructured data that can provide librarians with information about patrons' needs and insights about how to manage library services. Our research project is ongoing, but so far we have successfully taken a data set consisting of approximately 15,000 transcripts, 3 million words, and 100,000 unique tokens, and have developed a model for automatically processing transcripts, drawing out latent topics using unsupervised learning methods, and clustering transcripts into intuitive groupings. Based on early results, we have identified a number of potential applications for the model with respect to assessing and managing libraries' public services. In particular, librarians and library managers can use these types of machine learning models to improve their staff training processes, challenge underlying assumptions about how patrons engage with library services, and provide an 'early warning' mechanism when a library sees a sudden spike or change in the ways patrons engage with library services.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Coleman

Jason Coleman

Associate Professor & Department Head, Kansas State University
I am the Head of K-State Libraries' User Services Department. As such I oversee three combined circulation/reference desks as well as the Libraries' Interlibrary Services Unit. I am very interested in user service design, discovery systems, virtual reference, distance library services... Read More →
avatar for Jeremy Walker

Jeremy Walker

Public Services Librarian, Northwestern University



Wednesday March 20, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Olin-Rice 150

10:30am

Better Together: Libraries and Academic Technology
At Butler University, the Libraries and the Center for Academic Technology (CAT) were once separate entities with minimal collaboration. That changed with the advent of a shared student employment program between the Library’s Information Commons service desk and the Center for Academic Technology, which led to the Center for Academic Technology coming under the Leadership of the Dean of Libraries. The success of this collaborative program and the subsequent restructuring paved the way for other synergies both formal and informal. This includes initiatives such as exploring pedagogical approaches in Digital Humanities, promoting acquisition and creation of accessible video titles, and engagement in grant-funded projects focused on information literacy, among others. Almost certainly, Butler is not alone in discovering these collaborative potentials. This workshop will present Butler’s experience as a case study followed by participants working through a set of guided questions to help them explore organization and programmatic synergies with their institution’s libraries and academic technology units.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Janke

Thomas Janke

Director, Center for Academic Technology, Butler University
avatar for LJ Aucker

LJ Aucker

Information Commons Librarian, Butler University


Wednesday March 20, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Olin-Rice 100

10:30am

Citation Management Tools, Undergraduate Research Practices, and the Myth of the Digital Native
In an ideal world, citation management tools save researchers time by keeping content organized and automating rote tasks, a feat made possible by technological progress and a common set of workflows and habits of mind shared by all researchers. Unfortunately, we don’t live in an ideal world. Instead, we live in a world where citation management tools are prone to error, and a wide gulf separates the practices of novice researchers from those of expert researchers. Promoting citation management tools uncritically, without considering how they fit into students’ research processes, may undermine librarians’ ability to effectively help students. This problem may be compounded by the misguided notion that, as digital natives, students should be able to quickly and easily learn to use these tools. This session will explore the potential pitfalls of adopting a one-size-fits-all approach to supporting citation management in combination with the problem of treating students as digital natives. The session will also provide participants with insight into how one library engaged with students through focus groups and structured interviews to understand what tools best fit undergraduate research processes and what students actually expect of such tools.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Glauberman

Julia Glauberman

Instructional Services Coordinator, Binghamton University (SUNY)



Wednesday March 20, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Olin-Rice 250

10:30am

Creating a Culture of Innovation on a Dime (or Even Less)
Do you have colleagues that resist innovation, new ideas, and emerging technology? Do your staff meetings include “we’ve always done it this way” statements? Do your new ideas never take off because someone is afraid that they won’t work out? This presentation will discuss how you can create a culture that embraces innovation and is not afraid to fail. This presentation will also dispel the notion that new technology and innovative practices come with a large price tag. Participants will learn about real world examples of the low-cost innovations that we have put into practice at Westminster College’s Giovale Library. Some of which include: migrating to an open source ILS, re-designing our library classroom, rebranding and rethinking reference, beginning an OER initiative with no budget, and creating our own no-cost research guides. Participants will discuss how they can create a culture of innovation at their library and brainstorm innovations that they could put in place with minimal funding.


Wednesday March 20, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
JBD Lecture Hall

10:30am

Mirroring the Growth of JSTOR Forum: The University of Dubuque's Maturation in Creating Projects using JSTOR Forum
The University of Dubuque was one of the first users of SharedShelf/JSTOR Forum due to a CIC grant we received 3 years ago. Our digital projects have evolved along the same curvature as SharedShelf/JSTOR Forum. We have gone from using it solely as a repository, a shelf so to speak, where we were storing backend data to a tool that professors use to actively showcase their student’s scholarship and to engage in a digital conversation with other users who use the Artstor Digital Library; in other words, we contribute to a forum. When we started utilizing JSTOR Forum/SharedShelf, we took advantage of the storage space and organization tools available and primarily used it as a repository for archival works. With our first attempt at a digital collection, we learned how to use SharedShelf in conjunction with other programs such as OHMS (Oral History Metadata Synchronizer), Omeka, and Drupal to create an interactive collection. Just as SharedShelf made changes and grew into JSTOR Forum, we are also growing and using JSTOR Forum in new ways. So much so that it is a part of our 2018-2019 Strategic Plan with Actions. We are working with professors to use JSTOR Forum in the classroom and to promote/open publish student scholarship. No longer are we just using it as a repository, but we are using it to showcase our student’s creativity and our faculty’s contributions to the field.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Doll

Christopher Doll

Assistant Director of Tech Services & Archivist, University of Dubuque
Christopher Doll is the assistant director of technical services and archivist at the University of Dubuque.


Wednesday March 20, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Library 250

10:30am

QR Treasure Hunt for K-12 Classrooms
Join us in our discussion of the QR Code treasure hunt developed for K-12 students at St. Paul Public Schools. The treasure hunt is a fun and exciting student engagement activity where students use their own iPads to find and explore hidden QR codes that have been placed around their classroom. Once students have found one QR code, they are able to use their iPad’s QR Code reader or i-Nigma reader to reveal the question/task to answer or accomplish. The treasure hunt is run as a race or competition that can be implemented for individual or group participation.  Bring Your Own Device (tablet or smartphone) session.

Speakers
avatar for Jenifer Shier

Jenifer Shier

Library Media Specialist, St. Paul Public Schools (ISD-625)
Teaching Digital Library Information Literacy Skills from Pre-K through 12th Grade is my passion. Library Media Specialist Educator Licensed on K-12 from 3 States: U.S. Virgin Islands, New Mexico, and Minnesota ; and 1 International Librarian License from Philippines.


Wednesday March 20, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Library Harmon Room

10:30am

Team Troubleshooting: A Collaborative Approach to Public Library Tech Support
Library staff often have a wide range of skills, abilities, and comfort levels with technology. Some are terrified of pressing buttons while others feel comfortable pressing buttons they shouldn’t. Some public libraries have actual IT departments, while others have “someone who’s good with computers.” Regardless of the size or scope of IT support, a formal collaborative approach not only lightens the workload, but it can empower staff and improve morale. This session describes one public library’s experimental solution for IT support.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Gitchell Thompson

Erin Gitchell Thompson

Technology Librarian, Cedar Falls Public Library



Wednesday March 20, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Weyerhaeuser Boardroom

10:30am

Twitter and Other Social Media: Supporting New Types of Research Materials
In the past year more students and faculty are requesting support and access to social media data for their research. This area is fraught with problems and issues that are unique to our era and to these media. This session is intended as a basic introduction and participative session to help library staff better understand the nature of research in these areas and the issues facing researchers who want to use these media for their research projects. The workshop will involve attendees as we all work out some of the initial issues and clarify goals as we work with these users - and will include materials that will help guide attendees as we face these new resources and data sources.

Speakers
avatar for Cody Hennesy

Cody Hennesy

Journalism & Digital Media Librarian, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
NH

Nancy Herther

University of Minnesota Libraries



Wednesday March 20, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Leonard Center Hall Of Fame Room

10:30am

You've Got Mail: Tales of Form-Based Readers' Advisory
*Bing!* You've got mail from the University of Minnesota Libraries Book Matchmakers. - University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Access and Information Services staff will discuss their experiences promoting reading for pleasure using their Book Matchmaking service, a form-based readers advisory service. They will share how the service started and how with limited resources you can create a culture of outreach through form-based readers advisory at your library.

Speakers
avatar for Becky Adamski

Becky Adamski

Library Assistant, University of Minnesota
Becky Adamski is a Library Assistant at Wilson Library on the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. She helps to monitor & maintain the collection through stacks management activities, coordinates the social media channels of Wilson Library, helps users at services points and... Read More →
LB

Lynne Beck

Library Associate, University of Minnesota Libraries - Twin Cities
ME

Mark Engelmann

Library Assistant 3, University of Minnesota
avatar for Lacie McMillin

Lacie McMillin

Library Assistant, University of Minnesota Libraries
Lacie McMillin is a Library Assistant at Wilson Library on the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. She co-coordinates Intro to Library Research sessions for first year writing classes, helps users at the Wilson service points and on QuestionPoint, provides support for a collaborative... Read More →
avatar for Ashley Merrill

Ashley Merrill

Library Assistant 3, University of Minnesota
Ashley has worked in the University of Minnesota Libraries, both as a student employee and as full time staff for the past eight years. She is currently a Library Assistant in Wilson Library, acting primarily as a student supervisor. Here, she has a passion for working with students... Read More →



Wednesday March 20, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Olin-Rice 350

1:00pm

Choose Your Own Adventure: eBook Availability and Promotion on a College Campus
Join us to discuss the work done behind the scenes in preparation for, and the delivery of, an eBook workshop at Siena College, and the next steps in educating users about the current eBook landscape.The availability of eBooks through libraries varies considerably. From acquisition to access, from DRM flexibility to printing, saving, and sharing, it’s like those classic Choose Your Own Adventure books where each title has its own set of options and rules.We will explain how eBooks can be beneficial for online/hybrid courses, help reduce textbook costs for students.

Speakers
JF

Jennifer Fairall

Coordinator of Cataloging & Metadata Services, Siena College
AL

Ali Larsen

Serials Librarian, Siena College


Wednesday March 20, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Library 250

1:00pm

Get a Room! Creating a Campus-Wide Study Space Finder
Space is at a premium at all colleges and universities, yet students continue to clamor for more space to study--quiet spaces, group study rooms, rooms with windows, computer labs, coffee shops, power outlets and more. We set out to solve our space scarcity problem creatively with no coders, no money, and no time. Our project’s goal was to use students’ devices and smartphones to connect them with convenient hidden study spaces to meet their needs, thus maximizing space usage on campus. The solution we came up with brought together campus mapping experts, classroom management, libraries and campus IT with a low cost mapping tool (ArcGIS) to create a light-weight, student-friendly Study Space Finder (studyspace.umn.edu). The website has no been turned into an app available for iOS and Android. In this session, learn about how you too can help connect students with study space via low cost tools.

Speakers
JB

Jen Bentrim

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
DC

David Crane

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
TF

Tobias Fimpel

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
KP

Kate Peterson

Undergraduate Services Librarian, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
DS

Dan Sward

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities


Wednesday March 20, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Library Harmon Room

1:00pm

Google Analytics and Discovery Systems: Past, Present, and Future
Public, school, and academic libraries are increasingly being called upon to justify our place in the world using data we collect from the systems our patrons use every day. We strive to be highly attuned to our patrons’ needs, and are always seeking out new ways to improve library services. The integration of Google Analytics (GA) into Discovery can help libraries gather the necessary data to prove that patrons are using next generation library cataloging systems, and also collect data to analyze how patrons are using these systems. This session will briefly overview past research on integrating GA into library Discovery systems, and then cover setup and customization options that relate specifically to setting up GA for Discovery platforms. We’ll finish up by reviewing how the Carl B. Ylvisaker library at Concordia College is using their data to improve reference and instruction services, and look to the future of GA for libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Allie Thome

Allie Thome

Systems and Web Librarian, Concordia College Moorhead



Wednesday March 20, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Weyerhaeuser Boardroom

1:00pm

Linking to the Future: The University of Minnesota Libraries and the Linked Data for Production Project
Linked Data for Production (LD4P) is a multi-year, Mellon-funded collaborative project to create infrastructure and best practices for the creation, migration, and discovery of library metadata in an RDF-based format. For phase 3 of the project, the LD4P partners issued an open call for libraries to join a cohort that will begin to produce linked data in a sandbox developed in cooperation with the PCC (Program for Cooperative Cataloging). The overarching goal of this phase of the project is to move closer to actual cataloging production workflows, and to begin in earnest the long-discussed transition from the MARC record. The University of Minnesota Libraries’ successful proposal focuses on the cataloging of artists’ books and fine press materials. Our presentation will provide background about LD4P and the specific timeline and expectations of phase 3. We will describe the goals of our project, the work done thus far to contribute to the overall LD4P project, and our expected benefits and outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for Kristi Bergland

Kristi Bergland

Music Metadata Librarian, University Of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Kristi Bergland is the Music Metadata Librarian at the University of Minnesota Libraries. She also works with electronic books and streaming media. Other interests include citation management, equity, diversity, and inclusion work, and audio-visual preservation.
avatar for Kalan Knudson Davis

Kalan Knudson Davis

Special Collections Metadata Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries
kalan started working in cataloging as a student worker—fell in love and never left. She currently works at the University of Minnesota Libraries wrangling metadata, slinging MARC records for special and rare materials, creating reams of cataloging documentation, and happily pontificating... Read More →
avatar for Christine DeZelar-Tiedman

Christine DeZelar-Tiedman

Metadata and Emerging Technologies Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries
In my current position, I am the lead strategist for the University of Minnesota Libraries for Linked Data initiatives. In addition, I provide cataloging and metadata services for Minnesota's Archives and Special Collections, and coordinate the Electronic Theses and Dissertations... Read More →
avatar for Stacie Traill

Stacie Traill

Metadata Analyst, University of Minnesota Libraries
Stacie Traill is a Metadata Analyst at the University of Minnesota Libraries. Prior to her current role, she held positions as Cartographic and Electronic Resources Cataloger and Special Formats Cataloging Coordinator also at the University of Minnesota. Stacie has worked extensively... Read More →



Wednesday March 20, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Olin-Rice 150

1:00pm

Peaks, Plateaus, and Pitfalls: Lessons Learned Offering Patron Technology Training in the Library
Four years ago the BYU Library took over the role of software training from the Office of Information Technology. Ben will share lessons learned over that time on how to plan, promote, and teach successful workshops on everything from Photoshop and Illustrator, to Excel and PowerPoint, to Refworks and Wordpress.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Nielsen

Ben Nielsen

Media Center Specialist, Brigham Young University, Harold B. Lee Library
I manage the multimedia lab of the BYU library. We have an editing lab of iMacs, a sound booth, a production studio, an equipment checkout for audio and video equipment, and a software training program.



Wednesday March 20, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Olin-Rice 250

1:00pm

SCORM Modules for IL Instruction and Assessment
Rapid e-learning programs such as Articulate Storyline make it possible to develop highly interactive sharable content object reference model (SCORM) packages without advanced programming knowledge. These SCORM packages can be loaded into most learning management systems (LMS) and allow librarians to better gauge students' information literacy competency and create flipped instruction opportunities to allow for better use of valuable in-class time. Learn about the development, implementation, and evaluation of these SCORM packages, then join us in helping to improve them by downloading the open source packages from the project GitHub site - http://marquetterml.github.io/information-literacy-modules/.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Kowalik

Eric Kowalik

Instructional Designer, Marquette University



Wednesday March 20, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Olin-Rice 100

1:00pm

Using Moodle Lessons to Create Choose Your Own Adventure Training
Every year training is a struggle. Our student staff need to remember how to handle a variety of different scenarios, many of which don’t happen frequently enough for them to have memorized. Giving students enough practice so they know how to handle a situation is made more difficult by the need to have training be asynchronous. Recently I discovered a new tool and decided to use an old school technique to train our students how to handle various customer service interactions. It may not have been designed for it, but Moodle’s Lesson activity is ideal for creating choose your own adventure training. During this session we will choose our own adventure while learning how to create a lesson activity, what side quests to avoid, and end up with a successfully trained staff.

Speakers
HP

Heidi Pettitt

Access Services and Special Collections Librarian, Loras College



Wednesday March 20, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Leonard Center Hall Of Fame Room

1:00pm

Virtual Reality in Libraries: Three Methods for Offering Access to VR Technology to Your Users
The libraries at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, have been offering access to virtual reality technology for several years. We have experimented with how we offer the service in three distinct ways: circulating the hardware, offering a computing station that facilitates users to try a variety of VR experiences, and offering a development station that accommodates users who want to learn and create their own VR experiences. In this presentation we will discuss our successes and failures in experimenting with VR in our environment and the pros and cons of each method of offering the technology.

Speakers
avatar for Crague Cook

Crague Cook

Technology Operations Specialist, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Crague Cook has been involved in supporting customer facing technologies in high education institutions for over a decade. In 2013 he became a Technology Operations Specialist, where he assists in managing a large group of student workers, facilitates and maintains partnerships with... Read More →
avatar for Jay Ray

Jay Ray

Technology Operations Manager, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Jay Ray has spent his entire career in higher education technology across the non-profit sector, proprietary education, and public and private institutions, specifically focusing on help desk support and management, infrastructure design and implementation. In 2014, Jay took over... Read More →



Wednesday March 20, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
JBD Lecture Hall

2:15pm

Access for All: Accessibility Tips for Library Web Sites
Web Accessibility is critical for Library websites, databases, and discovery tools. This presentation will discuss visual, cognitive, and physical barriers to browsing and research online, and will highlight our Library's experiences with making our website and applications meet new Web Accessibility Standards (WCAG 2.0). This presentation will offer basic tips and methods for you to help make your websites and applications accessible to all.

Speakers
avatar for Leah Root

Leah Root

Web Developer, State of New York University at Geneseo
Accessibility, Usability, web development, IT, dogs, cats, archery.



Wednesday March 20, 2019 2:15pm - 3:15pm
JBD Lecture Hall

2:15pm

Authentication, Analytics and Gaining Insights for the Modern Library
Modern authentication systems offer more security and simplified analytics, enable access to reporting, and classify users with customizable attributes for nearly endless reporting options. Learn about Millersville University’s rationale and process of migrating from IP / Proxy based access to utilizing OpenAthens authentication for access control and reporting. Library resources and services can now more readily meet the needs of local and remote university users and selected community patrons. Approaches to aggregating user behavior to make better-informed collection and resource decisions will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Anderson

Scott Anderson

Information Systems Librarian and Associate Professor,, Millersville University



Wednesday March 20, 2019 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Library Harmon Room

2:15pm

Extending Knowledge: Learn More about Google Extensions
Google Extensions are add-ons that enhance your browsing experience. They can make your searching and internet tasks more efficient and user-friendly. This session will look at Google Extensions, giving an overview and showing how to use them. We will also be touching on a few of the most popular as well as lesser known and highly useful Extensions to make your life easier. For use with your Chromebook or with the Google Chrome browser. Bring Your Own Device session.

Speakers
avatar for Olivia Moris

Olivia Moris

Program Manager - MILI, Metronet
Information literacy is my specialty. I teach infolit to K-12 teachers and media specialists in metro area school districts. Our focus is on learning how to promote and teach information literacy using a variety of technology tools, specifically for the iPad. Reach out to me if you'd... Read More →



Wednesday March 20, 2019 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Olin-Rice 100

2:15pm

Libraries' Support of Innovative Teaching, Learning and Public Engagement through Course Integrated Student Media Projects
Libraries are in a primary position to help instructors evolve their curriculum to include more innovative approaches to teaching and student learning. The student media project is one such approach that is increasingly leveraged not only to help facilitate the acquisition of subject knowledge and digital media technical skill sets, but also critical thinking skills. This is often achieved through a required public engagement component (e.g., creating a documentary style digital story that highlights local issues or organizations, interviewing community members on camera, etc.). As part of an ongoing research project to explore the benefits and limitations of over 350 different course integrated student media assignments at the University of Minnesota, this session will showcase a number of examples that illustrate these projects’ potential. This session will provide an overview on the range of library based information and media related services deployed for each project with suggestions on how participants might consider adapting their own individual and organizational contexts to provide greater support for these rich learning experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Spicer

Scott Spicer

Media Outreach and Learning Spaces Librarian, University of Minnesota
I serve as Media Outreach and Learning Spaces Librarian for the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities Libraries. In this role, I am head of Media Services, a program dedicated to supporting the development of student media literacy skill sets, and promotion of deeper subject knowledge... Read More →


Wednesday March 20, 2019 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Leonard Center Hall Of Fame Room

2:15pm

Navigating the Line Between Data Privacy and Community Engagement
Options for digital marketing platforms are growing, allowing for greater opportunities to engage patrons online. However, in this era of digital engagement, librarians must consider patron privacy. How do you navigate the need to tell the library’s story and stay within the bounds of data security? What do you look for in a vendor’s privacy policy? This session will help you learn about some of the tools available for targeted marketing, keeping data privacy in mind. We will also explore points to consider before launching a new digital marketing tool.

Speakers
KP

Karen Pundsack

Great River Regional Library


Wednesday March 20, 2019 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Weyerhaeuser Boardroom

2:15pm

Peer Research and Technical Support Model
Grinnell College Burling Library has transitioned to a peer-driven reference desk model over the last several years. In the fall of 2018, we combined our student Research Tutor and Technology Consultant positions into a single role at Burling Library. Our former reference desk is now staffed entirely by peer tutors. Due to this promising approach, students now have increased access to research and technical support on a “when you need it basis”, while increasing librarian availability to provide more in depth support for deeper research questions. This session will cover an overview of the peer-driven reference desk model and the newly created Research & Technology Tutor (RTT) role and associated training, as well as what we have learned so far and our plans for the future.

Speakers
EB

Erika Barber

Systems Support, Grinnell College



Wednesday March 20, 2019 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Library 250

2:15pm

Print ("A Library's Jump into Coding Programs")
In the world today, coding is a hot topic, and everyone wants to get involved. Although not everyone will be a computer programmer, knowing the basics can help people work more efficiently and become better problem solvers. The only question is how does a public library introduce coding to its patrons? The Naperville Public Library started offering coding programs to the public in the summer of 2014. Since then, we have added a variety of different programs to our tool box. Are you interested in introducing your patrons to the world of coding? We will look over the different programs that range from traditional classroom training to family coding nights. We will explore how/why these programs were implemented, the resources we used, and all the bumps in the road along the way.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Charles

Jonathan Charles

Emerging Technologies Associate, Naperville Public Library
avatar for Sue Karas

Sue Karas

Emerging Technologies Supervisor, Naperville Public Library
I work with a team of Technology Instructors to bring forward facing technology to the community. We train customers and staff on the equipment and software and show them ways to satisfy their technology needs with what the library offers. I was a Computer Programmer/Systems Analyst... Read More →



Wednesday March 20, 2019 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Olin-Rice 250

3:30pm

A Seat at the Table: Embedding the Library in Curriculum Development
Learn how librarians at Concordia University, St. Paul are creating partnerships and leading a newly established Curriculum and Instruction Center to increase the library’s presence in online courses. As higher education adapts to increasing numbers of online courses, librarians are looking for new ways to make library resources and instruction relevant in the online environment. Librarians partner with instructional designers, academic technologists, and faculty members to redesign online courses to increase student engagement and retention. Collaborating with these other units on campus has resulted in liaison librarians, library resources, and information literacy being embedded in and built into the online curriculum.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Carlson

Jennifer Carlson

Concordia University, St. Paul
avatar for Dan Hoiland

Dan Hoiland

Instruction & Outreach Librarian, Concordia University, St. Paul
avatar for Rachel Wightman

Rachel Wightman

Associate Director for Instruction & Outreach, Concordia University


Wednesday March 20, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Weyerhaeuser Boardroom

3:30pm

Backup to the Future: Preserving Analog Memories at the Library
Having audio/video trapped in extinct formats (VHS, Betamax, 8mm film, reel-to-reel tape, etc,.) is almost the same as not having it at all. Rochester Public Library purchased some old and new equipment that allows patrons to digitize their video, film, audio and images in a self-serve Digital Conversion Lab so that future generations (and the current one) can enjoy them today. See what it takes to set up a conversion lab and hear about the challenges we faced at each stage of the process.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Lind

Brian Lind

Reference Librarian, Rochester Public Library
Reference Librarian, Rochester Public LibraryBrian Lind has been a Reference Librarian at Rochester Public Library since 2006. In addition to his reference work, he is in charge of Interlibrary Loan, Serials, and Music selection. He has set up a self-serve digital conversion space... Read More →



Wednesday March 20, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Olin-Rice 150

3:30pm

Drag Drop Done: Library Help in Canvas LTI
Faced with the opportunities of a campus-wide implementation of a new LTI, the possibilities of a new library management system (Alma-Primo), and a desire to put LibGuides in front of students, the University of St. Thomas Libraries partnered with the campus academic e-resources center to create “Library Help.” This Canvas LTI integration is a simple drag and drop navigation item instructors can place into courses on their own. Within the context of the course it lists relevant LibGuides, subject databases, course material, and even the reference librarian assigned to their subject area. Initial successes, failures, analytics, feedback, and code will be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Chad Kluck

Chad Kluck

Web Developer, University of St. Thomas
I specialize in online service and content delivery, web development, security, universal design, user experiences, and breaking down big concepts to meet stakeholders at their individual level. When it comes to back-end development I utilize PHP, Amazon Web Services, and APIs from... Read More →



Wednesday March 20, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Library 250

3:30pm

Guiding the Way Forward: Mobilizing Staff to Build a User-Centric LibGuides Collection
In July 2018, the College of Charleston Libraries hired a new Virtual Services Coordinator as well as a new User Experience Coordinator. These librarians, in addition to their reference and instruction duties, inherited oversight of a suite of Springshare products, including an extensive collection of LibGuides. Despite using guides for most library web pages, content and design had not been systematically reviewed since migration to LibGuides v2 in 2014. With departmental support, the newly hired librarians have set a goal of establishing and implementing best practices for guide development and maintenance that are informed by user research, universally designed (with special attention on reducing cognitive load), and feasible for librarians to keep up with alongside of various other duties. So far, a number of non-Springshare tools, including browser plug-ins and Google Forms, are being utilized so that part-time and student staff can assist with checking guides for broken links, even if they do not have a LibGuides account. Enlisting help from these staff makes the project more manageable for overstretched librarians, who then have more time to implement deeper changes to their guides. Best practices for designing, standardizing, and maintaining guides are being written. A plan for usability testing based on an existing student library advisory board is currently in the works. We envision an ongoing program of review, testing, and revision to foster a dynamic, user-centered web experience.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Kraft

Amanda Kraft

User Experience Coordinator, College of Charleston
Amanda Kraft is the User Experience Coordinator in the Research & Instruction Department at College of Charleston (CofC) Libraries and serves as the subject liaison to the CofC School of Business and the Computer Science department.
avatar for Gretchen Scronce

Gretchen Scronce

Virtual Services Coordinator, College of Charleston



Wednesday March 20, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Olin-Rice 100

3:30pm

Measuring the Gap: Collection Analysis with Overlap Analysis and Usage Statistics
For several years now, libraries have had access to collection development reports via their integrated library or electronic resource management systems, such as overlap analysis. However, these reports are often standalone, and are not combined with other key collection analysis data, such as COUNTER usage statistics. This session seeks to demonstrate how libraries can easily combine overlap analysis reports and usage statistics to generate powerful custom reports showing deeper information about subscribed electronic resource collections, such as unique title usage and overlapped title usage. Such information can be used to make more informed collection development decisions, especially in libraries with limited budgetary resources. This session will focus on tools available through Serials Solutions 360 and Alma, but the concepts should be applicable across most available library management systems.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Lewis

Amanda Lewis

Cataloging and Acquisitions Library Technician, Metropolitan State University Library
avatar for Zorian Sasyk

Zorian Sasyk

E-Resources and Discovery Librarian, Metropolitan State University



Wednesday March 20, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Leonard Center Hall Of Fame Room

3:30pm

Project Management with Basecamp and Google Apps
As libraries take on more types of projects in new areas and collaborate with community partners in new kinds of events, project management becomes more complicated. Saint Paul Public Library used Basecamp and Google Forms to organize multi-presenter events like Maker Fest, Tinker Tuesdays and ToshoCon, the library anime convention. With these tools, staff brainstormed ideas, commented on documents, held e-meetings, and created databases of community partners. This session will give attendees the tools they need for their own projects and events.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Herman

Andrea Herman

Library Specialist, Saint Paul Public Library
"Everything I do got to be funky."


Wednesday March 20, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
JBD Lecture Hall

3:30pm

Sustaining an Academic Makerspace
Makerspaces have become more and more common in academic libraries, but what does it take for one to be sustainable in the long-term? In this session, we’ll discuss how we’ve learned to adapt to the changing needs of our campus, how we've worked with students to create meaningful rules and regulations, and how we’ve been working to establish a campus-wide presence and make lasting connections with faculty and students. We’ll also explore some of the ways makerspaces can enhance student success. Attendees are welcome to share their successes and challenges with academic makerspaces.

Speakers
avatar for Angela Vanden Elzen

Angela Vanden Elzen

Reference & Learning Technologies Librarian and Assistant Professor, Lawrence University Library
Angela Vanden Elzen is the Reference & Learning Technologies Librarian at Lawrence University’s Seeley G. Mudd Library. In this role, she provides reference services, manages the campus makerspace, oversees the library website, co-leads social media initiatives, and gets to teach... Read More →


Wednesday March 20, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Library Harmon Room

3:30pm

You Can Do It!: How Newbie Podcasters and a Wildly Inexperienced Video Team Got Off the Ground and Connected with the Library Community
In our on-demand world, podcasts and videos are popular communication formats, but creating interesting content that engages audiences is still a challenge! Come talk with us about what we have learned to do (and NOT to do!). We will share strategies for making engaging content, for reaching your audience, and for connecting with the library.

Speakers
AG

Angie Gentile-Jordan

Central Minnesota Libraries Exchange
MJ

Mary Jordan

Central Minnesota Libraries Exchange
avatar for Zachariah Miller

Zachariah Miller

Head of Communications, Minitex


Wednesday March 20, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Olin-Rice 250
 
Thursday, March 21
 

10:30am

A Tale of Two Libraries and their Streaming Video
Learn the pros and cons of streaming video, which offers convenience and functionality but also concerns about privacy and preservation. You'll learn from the experience of two libraries currently using this technology.

Speakers
CB

Cindy Badilla-Meléndez

Head of Music and Media Collections, University of St. Thomas
avatar for Barb Bergman

Barb Bergman

Media Services Librarian, Minnesota State University, Mankato
media services librarian, Minnesota State University Mankato


Thursday March 21, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Library 250

10:30am

Hands-On-Tech Pop-Up Classes at the Library
Although the academic library continues to serve as the campus resource for literature, the library continues to look for new ways to facilitate learning. One way the Loyola Notre Dame Library has encouraged new learning is through the exploration of technology. The Loyola Notre Dame Library believes that the ability to create and navigate technology is in alignment with the expanded scope of information literacy as described in the Association of College & Research Library’s “Framework for Information Literacy” and works towards answering the need for digital literacy.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Treskon

Matthew Treskon

Technology Librarian, Loyola Notre Dame Library
Provides strategic vision and leadership of library technology operations and initiatives to support faculty and students.



Thursday March 21, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
JBD Lecture Hall

10:30am

Intro to Virtual/Augmented/Mixed Reality in Libraries
In this session, Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), Mixed Reality (MR), eXtended Reality (XR) will be introduced in simple terms, and connection to the 21st library will be established. Examples of VR and AR library orientation will be presented, compared and discussed with participants. The moderators will lead a discussion about the technological aspects, as well as the educational value of adding VR and AR to the traditional methods of teaching and learning, as well as the implications for library patrons.

Speakers
avatar for Plamen MIltenoff

Plamen MIltenoff

St. Cloud State
MG

Mark Gill

St. Cloud State University
AL

Aura Lippincott

Western Connecticut State University
avatar for Kristi Newgarden

Kristi Newgarden

Charter Oak State College


Thursday March 21, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Weyerhaeuser Boardroom

10:30am

Local Web Archiving for the Uninitiated Public Library: The Community Webs Program
Many public libraries have active local history collections and collect print materials that document their communities, but, due to to various challenges, very few public libraries are building web archives. Community Webs is an IMLS-funded program that provides education, training, professional networking, and technical services to enable public libraries to fulfill this vital role. Participating libraries have been using Archive-It, the web archiving tool of the Internet Archive. This panel presentation will feature a representative from the Internet Archive and program participants from cohort libraries of varying sizes, including the New Brunswick Free Library of New Brunswick, NJ, and the Marshall-Lyon County Library of Marshall, MN. The Internet Archive will talk about the development, group activities, and outcomes of the full Community Webs program. Cohort librarians will briefly discuss their local projects and share their experiences with the program and tools, including challenges, successes, and tips. Time will be provided for Q&A discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Jacquelyn Oshman

Jacquelyn Oshman

New Brunswick Free Public Library (New Brunswick, NJ)
avatar for Kyrie Whitsett

Kyrie Whitsett

Partner Coordinator, Internet Archive
As Archive-It’s Partner Coordinator for the Internet Archive, Kyrie Whitsett is often the first person that Archive-It partners meet on their way to web archiving together. She lives in San Francisco and joined the Archive-It team in 2016 after a stint volunteering at the Internet... Read More →
avatar for Emilirose Rasmusson

Emilirose Rasmusson

Teen/Digital Librarian, Marshall-Lyon County Library (Marshall, MN)



Thursday March 21, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Leonard Center Hall Of Fame Room

10:30am

Taking LibGuides to the Next Level: A Work in Progress
Learn some tips for creating visual cues to improve readability, branding, and the overall public user interface (UI) of your Springshare LibGuides. This presentation will share some fairly simple code and design approaches that resulted in some successes and unexpected outcomes while working to improve LibGuides at an academic library. The recommendations and code samples can be applied to any library or information center utilizing LibGuides. Attendees will learn how to enhance guides to appeal to different learning styles, help users on smaller devices better navigate guides, and create more universally accessible pages to better need the needs of all users. Even if you are not familiar with HTML and CSS, you will be able to copy and paste some of the simple code snippets presented into your own guides, or other online development projects. 

Speakers
avatar for William Straub

William Straub

Virtual Services Librarian, Bush Memorial Library at Hamline University



Thursday March 21, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Olin-Rice 350

10:30am

Untethered: Utilizing an iPad Flashcard App to Interactively Engage and Educate Attendees at Outreach Activities
Attracting event attendees to stop and interact with library staff about library resources and services is a persistent problem in librarianship, especially when you are competing against other, “flashier” exhibits within the immediate area. The challenge is to come up with a way to captivate people and engage them long enough to enlighten them about what the library has to offer that doesn’t involve lugging around a heavy or awkward laptop and requiring access to often patchy or expensive internet service.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Chew

Katherine Chew

Associate Librarian, University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries
Katherine Chew, MLS, is an Associate Librarian and the Research/Outreach Services Librarian for the Health Sciences Libraries at the University of Minnesota. She provides research support and consultation to University of Minnesota researchers in the Academic Health Center. As Outreach... Read More →


Thursday March 21, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Library Harmon Room

10:30am

Using Your Library's Virtual Presence to Reach Users with Disabilities
Is your library working towards improving accessibility to customers with disabilities? Have you developed new programs and services that intentionally welcome individuals with special needs, but are struggling to connect with your target audience? Developing inclusive library services will be more effective if your library connects with the disability community, and leveraging your organization’s virtual presence will help you do that. Dakota County Library’s Youth Services Manager Renee Grassi will share strategies to optimize your library’s website, social media, and digital resources to welcome individuals with disabilities at the library. Learn about innovative, easily replicable and cost-efficient ways to increase awareness of your library services and reach new users in your community.

Speakers
RG

Renee Grassi

Dakota County Library


Thursday March 21, 2019 10:30am - 11:30am
Olin-Rice 250

1:00pm

Better Questions for Better Usability
Usability testing is invaluable for helping us understand what our users want and need, and asking good questions can help us gain the most insight. Usability testing questions that are relevant, clear, and inclusive are key to discovering what good usability really means for our users. The Hennepin County Library usability team will share what we’ve learned from our ongoing usability testing about creating the best and most helpful usability tasks. We’ll also share tips on helpful follow-up questions and how to use questions to redirect usability participants that go down unexpected paths. Whether you're new to or experienced with usability testing, thoughtful focus on your questions can help make your testing more effective and relevant.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Hirt

Tony Hirt

Librarian, Hennepin County Library
avatar for Amy Luedtke

Amy Luedtke

Acting Coordinating Librarian, Hennepin County Library
Amy has been a public librarian with HCL for almost twenty years and has been a children's librarian, a teen librarian, and a branch manager. Amy loves being able to combine her experiences of serving youth and families with the field of web user experience. Amy received her MLS from... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Rosso

Stephanie Rosso

Principal Web Developer, Hennepin County Library



Thursday March 21, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
JBD Lecture Hall

1:00pm

Chat Reference at the State Library: #everythingNC to Everyone (in) NC
At the North Carolina Government & Heritage Library, part of the State Library of North Carolina, we have seen our in-person library traffic decrease as the online traffic to our resources has increased. In an effort to meet our patrons where they are, we now offer chat reference during our Monday-Friday business hours. As a library that serves a variety of patron types from all over the state, our patrons range from kindergarten through college students and teachers to family history researchers, from state government employees to library employees, and all types of public researchers in between. The lessons we’ve learned and support systems we’ve put in place thus far can be applied to all types of libraries that provide chat reference. In this presentation, we will share our successes, failures, and solutions from our chat reference program. We’ll provide a history of our chat program and discuss how we train our staff--reference, cataloging, access services, and more--to provide online reference; discuss features of the chat software we use to support our chat staff and share internal information; and share tips for addressing the challenges that come with trying to be #everythingNC to every type of patron, while avoiding collecting more personally-identifying information than is necessary to provide service. Session attendees will learn ways to empower non-reference staff to succeed at chat reference, when and how to provide patron support beyond the chat interaction, and ideas for managing trolls and emergency situations.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Hanft

Jennifer Hanft

Education & Instruction Librarian, State Library of North Carolina
Library interests include: training & facilitation, reference & instruction, marketing & outreach. Passionate about NCLA; currently serving as Continuing Education Liaison on the Executive Board, LAMS Secretary/Treasurer, and a member of the Leadership Institute Planning Committe... Read More →
EH

Erin Holmes

Systems Integration Librarian, State Library of North Carolina



Thursday March 21, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Library Harmon Room

1:00pm

Student Podcasting Assignments: Merging Information Literacy and Technology Training in the College Classroom
The CSB/SJU Libraries and CSB/SJU Instructional Technology (formerly Media Services) staff have recently started partnering with faculty from several departments on student podcasting assignments. This session will go over assignment details, the free and relatively simple-to-use technologies we employ, and the supporting documents and resources we’ve developed to support student success. We’ll examine how common information literacy learning objectives for more traditional, paper-based assignments map to podcasting assignments. Session presenters will also address the strengths we each bring to this project (i.e., expertise in information literacy instruction versus technology training and support) and how our shared contributions have led to stronger project design and implementation.

Speakers
avatar for Adam Konczewski

Adam Konczewski

Instructional Technology Specialist, College of Saint Benedict/Saint John\\\\\\\'s University
As a Instructional Technology Ninja, Adam Konczewski has been working with both students and faculty by implementing and facilitating modern technology into the hands of future generations. His skills with 3D printing, video production, and robotics have served well when guiding classes... Read More →
avatar for Diana Symons

Diana Symons

Social Sciences Librarian, College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University



Thursday March 21, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Olin-Rice 250

1:00pm

Text Mining for Librarians: Opportunities and Challenges
Although it began in the digital humanities, text mining is becoming increasingly common in other disciplines. Text mining is the process of using software to analyze and investigate text documents to find patterns and concepts. It provides new opportunities for librarians to support researchers as well as engage in their own research. The session will provide an overview of the basics of text mining, how it is being used in current research, and the tools available both free and fee-based. The discussion will continue with potential sources of text to use, looking at text that is both freely available and that which is available through licenses. The presenters will cover the challenges of working with licensed material and the expertise and experience that electronic resource librarians can contribute. Finally the presenters will discuss examples of text mining projects and the session will wrap up with a hands on exploration of a free web based text mining tool. For those who wish to participate in the hands on section please bring a personal device. To access the presentation slides and text files to use during the hands on section of the panel please use the following link. https://z.umn.edu/libtech-mining . Bring Your Own Device session.

Speakers
avatar for Kristen Cooper

Kristen Cooper

Plant Sciences Librarian, University of MN Libraries
Kristen Cooper is the Plant Sciences Librarian at the University of Minnesota. She supports the research of faculty and staff in her departments which includes research metrics and scholarly impact.
avatar for Cody Hennesy

Cody Hennesy

Journalism & Digital Media Librarian, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
avatar for Julie Kelly

Julie Kelly

Librarian, University of Minnesota, Magrath Library


Thursday March 21, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Olin-Rice 100

1:00pm

The Dynamic and Diverse Scholarly Information Landscape: What's Next?
We believe that there have been recent fundamental changes in how faculty gather scholarly information, collaborate with others, and teach students. We created a faculty survey to discover how these trends are changing, how they affect access delivery, and how they might impact our teaching at a small liberal arts college. Considering these changes, are the tools we pay for and use in libraries still cost effective? If we believe scaffolding information literacy instruction is important, how should we bring students through our education systems and beyond? These are the kinds of questions we had about faculty research trends. We compared our results to three years of first-year student data on research preferences to see where favorites overlapped, or more importantly, where they diverged. In this session, we will share our findings, discuss the results, and ask for your input. How do we all work together to benefit from diverse research styles and techniques, and how might we use others’ perspectives to enhance our own research? Bring Your Own Device session.

Speakers
avatar for Theresa Borchert

Theresa Borchert

Electronic Resources Librarian, Concordia College, Moorhead


Thursday March 21, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Leonard Center Hall Of Fame Room

1:00pm

The Escape Room: Supporting Student Success Through a Game-based Immersive Experience
Our library prides itself on embracing new and innovative ways to encourage students to connect to and utilize the Libraries’ resources and services. In August 2018 we created a library Escape Room, highlighting key resources and technologies to promote library literacy through a game-based, active learning exercise. Escape Rooms are a recent and popular phenomenon. They are a physical adventure game that require participants to complete a series of puzzles or tasks to advance to the next stage and, eventually, to “escape from the room.” The challenges our participants face compel them to engage with various elements of our Makerspace, Virtual Reality, and Digital Media spaces, to investigate the capabilities of Tech Lending items, and even to perform basic database research. The Escape Room has appealed to a diverse range of students, from first-time visitors to power users. We believe that the Escape Room has provided a platform to both help improve academic performance by increased familiarity with the Libraries’ resources, but also provide opportunities for participants to become aware of other services and expertise we offer. We believe that the Escape Room is the first step towards providing a new form of programming, one that incorporates elements of both information literacy and increased awareness of library resources and services into a physical, problem-solving game. We would like to share with you our experiences in developing and implementing this activity.

Speakers
avatar for Justin Haynes

Justin Haynes

Staff, North Carolina State University
avatar for David Tully

David Tully

North Carolina State University


Thursday March 21, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Weyerhaeuser Boardroom

1:00pm

Virtually Expanding Your Bookshelves
Library buildings are expensive and cannot be continually expanded to fit the always increasing amount of items available for library communities. The Beaver Dam Community Library is running out of shelving space, yet the librarians are able to add thousands of new materials to their shelves each year. Over the last three years, the Beaver Dam Community Library has expanded the digital resources available to its community. Applications such as RBDigital, Overdrive, Hoopla, and several more offer patrons an expanded amount of items ready for checkout. Movies, e-books, e-audiobooks, and music are all available at the click of a button, even when the library is closed. Through this shelving expansion, the public library’s staff has created programs and marketing schemes to teach its community about using computers and tablets to access these digital resources. The digital resources, their successes, and failures will be reviewed along with some tips and tricks on how the librarians handle the constant learning curve during a digital shelving expansion.

Speakers
avatar for Colleen Hallfrisch

Colleen Hallfrisch

Technology and Public Services Librarian, Beaver Dam Community Library


Thursday March 21, 2019 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Olin-Rice 150